Emilie Cohen, Chad Levett, Mathew de Marchie, Luka Vaguidov, Anna Romanowski

Task one:

  1. Coping with the loss of a loved one
  2. Having to progress despite not being fully ready
  3. Struggling with the uncertainties of the future
  4. The difficulties of having to adapt to a new environment
  5. Craving to love and to be loved

People constantly struggle with adapting to new environments.

Accepting the uncertainties of the future

Task two:

Craving to love and to be loved

  1. What are the barriers you’ve encountered in finding love?
  2. What makes you lovable?
  3. What makes you unlovable?
  4. Do you find it easy to keep romantic love alive?
  5. What makes someone worth your love?

 

Task three:

  1. How do you know that you truly love someone?
  2. Is love truly worth all the struggle that we go through to attain it?
  3. Is it possible to live a fulfilling life without ever having romantic love?

 

Task five:

Chosen Literary element: Metaphor/Simile

  1. “We are opposing floats in a parade” (48)
  2. “It’s like a spa facility on lockdown” (45)
  3.  “I turn off my light I can see men like black stars in their bright rooms” (45)

Task six:

  1. On one of the nights, she looks out her window and
  2.  Upon her arrival at the shelter, she receives handouts and packets and thinks, “it’s like a spa facility on lockdown” (45).
  3.  On the first night in her room at the women’s shelter, she looks out her window and she “can see men like black stars in their bright rooms” (45).

Task seven:

  1. The use of metaphors and similes in “Moving On” helps to show how she is adapting to her new environment.
  2. The metaphors and similes in “Moving On” show the reader some of the main character’s interior conflicts and struggles.
  3. “Moving On” relies on metaphors and similes to demonstrate the main character’s feelings of not belonging in her new environment.